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Sunday, May 3, 2020 | History

2 edition of Excavations at the Roman town at Brough, E. Yorkshire, 1936 found in the catalog.

Excavations at the Roman town at Brough, E. Yorkshire, 1936

Philip Corder

Excavations at the Roman town at Brough, E. Yorkshire, 1936

by Philip Corder

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Published by Published by the Hull Museum Committee by arrangement with Hull University College Local History Committee in Hull .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Excavations (Archaeology) -- England -- Yorkshire.,
  • Great Britain -- Antiquities, Roman.

  • Edition Notes

    Cover title.

    Statementby Philip Corder and Rev. Thomas Rromans.
    ContributionsRomans, Thomas., University College of Hull. Local history committee., Hull Museum Committee.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination68 p., [4] p. of plates (inc. front.) :
    Number of Pages68
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL16338136M

    Eboracum (Latin /ebo'rakum/, English / iː ˈ b ɒ r ə k ə m / or / ˌ iː b ɔː ˈ r ɑː k ə m /) was a fort and later a city in the Roman province of its prime it was the largest town in northern Britain and a provincial capital. The site remained occupied after the decline of the Western Roman Empire and ultimately evolved into the present-day city York, occupying the same. Some time before a remarkable hoard of Early Iron Age metalwork, almost entirely in bronze, was accidentally discovered in the vicinity of the parish of Stanwick St John, North Riding of Yorkshire, and near the great earthworks of the same period later to be excavated by Sir Mortimer Wheeler.

    Philip Corder, Excavations at the Roman fort at Brough-on-Humber, Hull ; and Sir George Macdonald, The Roman Wall in Scotland, 2nd ed. Oxford PSAN ser. 4, vi pt. 6, , Commentary by Pete Wilson: The Society of Antiquaries of London (SAL) Minute Book for 27 November records that Francis Drake () brought an Engraven Map of the Roman Roads in Yorkshire which [he] intends to dedicate to the Society” (SAL Minutes II).

    Road 2, approaching York from the E., eventually from Brough, PETVARIA, and the Humber crossing, and from the E. coast via Stamford Bridge, joins the city boundary along the Hull Road, W. of Gallows Hole (N.G. ). Short of the boundary it is visible as a soil mark S. of the Hull Road on an R.A.F. air-photograph (1/–58/, prints. BROUGH PARISH is about 8 miles in length and 5 in breadth, and is a mountainous district, comprehending a large portion of the wild forest of Stainmore, being bounded on the east by Yorkshire, on the south by Kirkby Stephen parish, on the west by Great Musgrave, and on the north by the lofty fells of Hilbeck, Warcop, Dow Crags, & central portion of it is tolerable fertile, but the rest is.


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Excavations at the Roman town at Brough, E. Yorkshire, 1936 by Philip Corder Download PDF EPUB FB2

The Roman Bath discovered in during the 1936 book of the Mail Coach Inn, St Sampson's Square, York Author Inin advance of construction work on new houses, York Archaeological Trust excavated at Welton Road, Brough-on-Humber, east of the Roman walled settlement.

The town is usually identified as Petuaria and assumed to be the civitas capital of the Parisi, the local Romano-British tribe.

page note 4 Corder, P. and Romans, T., Excavations at the Roman Town at Brough, E. Yorkshire, (Report vi, ). page note 5 Transactions of the Cumberland and Westmorland Antiquarian and Archaeological Society, new series (afterwards referred to as CIV2), Cited by: 2.

The Roman settlement at Brough-on-Humber. The small Roman town of Brough-on-Humber is situated close to the north bank of the Humber estuary, 18km from Kingston-upon-Hull and 44km south-east of York.

YORKSHIRE ARCHAEOLOGICAL JOURNAL development-led excavations at Glen Garth and at the adjoining Plough Inn within the village in –2. The vast majority of sites of the Romano-British period within the modern East Riding represent native sites that were receiving occasional Roman goods.

The only sites in this areaAuthor: D. Evans. 80 Corder, and Romans, Excavations at the Roman Town at Brough, Yorks, E. (Hull, ), cited as Brough. 81 Colchester Museum, Annual Reportpl. VIII, no. 82 cf.

also from Rudston, Yorks Arch. Journ. XXXIII (),fig. iv, 2. Bibliography. A B C D E F G H I J Excavations at the Roman town at Brough L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z. Allason-Jones, L. and Miket, R. The Catalogue of Small Finds from South Shields Roman Fort.

Silchester (Calleva Atrebatum) is the most extensively excavated of all Romano-British town-sites but the majority of the finds, now in Reading Museum, remain unately these finds were not related stratigraphically to the site and therefore remained undated; insula and pit provenance is the most that was recorded, and then only occasionally, in the early years of excavation.

Petuaria (or Petuaria Parisorum) was originally a Roman fort situated where the town of Brough in the East Riding of Yorkshire now stands. Petuaria means something like 'quarter' or 'fourth part', incorporating the archaic Brythonic * petuar, 'four' (compare modern Welsh pedwar).

It was founded in 70 AD and abandoned in about Aldborough was the ‘capital’ of the Romanised Brigantes, the largest tribe in Britain at that time. One corner of these Yorkshire defences is laid out amid a Victorian arboretum, and two mosaic pavements can be viewed in their original positions.

The site’s fascinating museum has an outstanding collection of Roman finds. Don't Miss. Brief Accounts of Each Roman road in Yorkshire. The map below is interactive - simply click on any road to bring up a brief summary. Alternatively, below the map is a list of all the known, probably and claimed roads in Yorkshire - each road name is clickable and will.

A KENT archaeologist is believed to have located the lost Roman town of Noviomagus and solved the mystery of an ancient map that has confounded scholars for almost years. Church Brough was a planned town that grew up under the protection of Brough Castle, itself built partly upon the site of the Roman fort of Verteris.

To the east of the castle was the market place, surviving as a green, with, on the north side of the old market, the burgage plots of the early settlements. page 64 note 1 J. Bushe-Fox, Excavations on the Site of the Roman Town at Wroxeter, Shropshire, inpage 64 note 2 Miller, S.

N., The Roman Fort at Balmuildy on the Antonine Wall. Archaeological Journal. Search in: Advanced search. Submit an article. New content North Yorkshire, Part 2: A summary description of the earthworks. Humphrey Welfare, excavations of the roman fort and town – By M.

B ishop and J. D ore. The Roman legionary fortress at York. References Site. Brinklow, D. ‘Fortress wall in bus lay-by’, Interim: the Archaeology of Y 16–18 Dyer, J. and Wenham, L.P. ‘Excavations and discoveries in a cellar in Messrs.

Chas. Hart’s premises, Feasgate, York, ’, Yorkshire Archaeological Jour –25 Evans, D.T. ‘Excavations at the former Daveygate. Brough was relatively small for a planned Roman town, at just hectares, much smaller than Aldborough (Isurium Brigantum) in North Yorkshire, but a single letter “C” on a plaque recording the gift of a theatre to the town (Halkonp), is usually interpreted as an abbreviation of “Civitas”, a tribal area, giving the town the.

ROMAN BROUGH. Ever since the antiquary William Camden identified the site as Roman Verteris in the 16th century, local antiquaries have been aware of Brough’s ancient past, and Roman finds have been casually picked up there.

In Henry Ecroyd-Smith wrote a paper on the site, characterising it as ‘a neglected Roman station’. He described the remarkable range of finds, emphasising the. A Brief History of Brough Details Tuesday, 27 January The Stainmore Pass was used from Roman times as the main East to West crossing of the Pennines and from the 17th to the 19th centuries was the posting road from Glasgow, Carlisle and Penrith to York and Durham.

Here a Roman town called Bainesse, just south of Catterick, has previously been found and much knowledge has now been gained following the excavation of a. Cool, H. E M. (). The Roman Cemetery at Brougham, Street: Society for the Promotion of Roman Studies.The work adds to our knowledge of Roman South Yorkshire, although this was only an evaluation trench.” The volunteer donators played their part under expert supervision, having been given the chance to join in as one of the rewards offered by the first crowdfunding archaeology campaign in the region.understanding of Roman York and Yorkshire, institutions with skills to disseminate findings, and enthusiastic audiences eager to engage with their Roman heritage.

Roman York and Yorkshire as archaeological resource Between and there were excavations of Roman remains carried out by YAT alone. These and a large number of other.